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placename:- Voreda
locality:- Old Penrith
locality:- Plumpton Wall
parish Hesket parish, once in Cumberland
county:- Cumbria
roman fort
coordinates:- NY493384
10Km square:- NY43

1Km square NY4938

photograph

Voreda -- Old Penrith -- Plumpton Wall -- Hesket -- Cumbria / -- 11.3.2009
photograph

Voreda -- Old Penrith -- Plumpton Wall -- Hesket -- Cumbria / -- 11.3.2009

old map:- Ford 1839 map

Map of the Lake District, published in A Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by William Ford, published by Charles Thurnham, London, 1839.
thumbnail FD02NY43, button to large image
Voreda

placename:- Voreda
county:- Cumberland
date:- 1839
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

descriptive text:- Ford 1839 (3rd edn 1843)

Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by William Ford, published by Charles Thurnham, London, et al, 1839; published 1839-52.
Page 174:-
...
Plumpton.- On the left are the ruins of Old Penrith, formerly a Roman station, traces of which still remain. It was 170 yards from south to north, and 110 from east to west. The station is about 200 yards from the river Petteril. The ramparts are still high, and the ditch very visible. Horsley supposes it to have been Bremetereracum.

placename:- Old Penrith
other name:- Bremetereracum
date:- 1839
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

old text:- Camden 1789 (Gough Additions)

Britannia, or A Chorographical Description of the Flourishing Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by William Camden, 1586, translated from the 1607 Latin edition by Richard Gough, published London, 1789.
Page 189:-
...
The rev. Mr. Robert Patten of Carlisle or Penrith, who had been in Denmark and at Tunis, writes thus to Mr. Horsley, Jan. 30, 1730/1:
"... The old castle [Old Penrith], as the country people call it, is 130 yards in front, a visible entry exactly in the middle, with a large foss on all sides, the breadth 80 yards. This is what Camden calls Petriana, from the small river Peterel that runs under it. ...
Page 190:-
...
Horsley places VOREDA, Ant. Bremetenracum Not. Berida of Ravennas, at Old Penrith, and removes PETRIANA to Cambeck fort or Castle steeds. The remains of the outbuildings and station are very considerable; the fort above six chains (132 yards) long, and five broad, containing about three acres. Plumton wall is the village near it, and the house nearest the station the Lough. The station, now called Castle steeds, lies about 200 yards east from the Peterel, the ramparts high, and the ditch pretty perfect; the entrances all visible in the middle of the sides, the praetorium appears near the north rampart, and great ruins of a town are on the west side next the river. The east and west ramparts of the station measure 140 yards, and the north and south 120. ... All the inscriptions which Mr. Camden saw here are lost. Gadenius on the first has been reckoned among our northern tutelar deities by Mr. Burton, but Mr. Horsley thinks it the name of a deceased person, for whom Ulpius Trajanus Martius erected this monument. If the Gadeni were here, might he not be a Gadenian? The 3d may be read, Dis manibus, Flavio Martio senatori (or seniori) in colonia or civitate (or cohorti) Carvetiorum quaestori taking the o after this word for a stop) vixit annos 45, &c. TIT. in the 4th is titulus, a word that occurs in Gruter frequently for a monumental stone. In the 2d AICCETUOS and LATTIE are nominative cases of the names of a mother and daughter. Gruter has L. Atilio incorrectly. Woodford's MS. gives one like the conclusion of this
Since Mr. Camden's time the inscription in Pl.X. fig.4 has been found at Lough, and placed in the garden of Dr. Fleming, dean of Carlisle, at Great Salkeld, broken in three pieces and part lost. It is the second among us in honour of Alexander Severus and his mother Mammaea here called Mater Castrorum, as other empresses on other inscriptions and the whole imperial family. An altar to Jupiter. Another to Mogon, the local deity of the Gadeni, and a similar altar, but plain, and two other carved stones. An inscription to Jupiter and the emperors of the name of Philips.
At Plumpton, the antient Voreda or Petriana, near Penrith, was found an altar, inscribed, Deo Sancto Belatuca aram in the possession of capt. Dalston.
Browne Willis communicated to the Society of Antiquaries 1747, a stone with a bust and this inscription:
found at Castle Steeds near the great fort Petriana. Mr. Ward, reads it D. M. Gemelli Caius Aurelius Flavius Hilario sepulcrum hoc fieri curavit. Gemellus occurs at Binchester, Horsl. Durh. xxix. and Hilario in Gruter, and the head he supposes Pluto. Libert being before Hilario in Gruter, he thinks this may be Flavius libertus.

placename:- Petriana
other name:- Bremetenracum
other name:- Berida
other name:- Castle Steeds
other name:- Old Castle, The
person:- archaeologist : Horsley, John
person:- : Burton, Mr
person:- : Gruter
person:- : Fleming, Dr
person:- : Dalston, Captain
person:- : Willis, Browne
person:- : Ward, Mr
date:- 1789
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old text:- Camden 1789

Britannia, or A Chorographical Description of the Flourishing Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by William Camden, 1586, translated from the 1607 Latin edition by Richard Gough, published London, 1789.
Page 173:-
...
... I saw the great remains of a ruined town, which they, from its neighbourhood, called Old Perith, and I should think PETRIANAE. That the Ala Petriana was here appears from a fragment of an old inscription erected by Ulpius Trajanus, a veteran of the Ala Petriana, which, together with others that I copied here, I have subjoined:
Page 174:-

placename:- Old Penrith
other name:- Petrianae
date:- 1789
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old text:- Clarke 1787

Guide book, A Survey of the Lakes of Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire, by James Clarke, Penrith, Cumberland, and in London etc, 1787 and 1789; and Plans of the Lakes ... 1793.
Page 16:-
... ruins of the Ala Petriana which Horsley and others call Old Penrith; for Ala Petriana, or Camlic Fort, is at the distance of five miles; ...

placename:- Ala Petriana
other name:- Old Penrith
other name:- Camlic Fort
date:- 1787
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old text:- Clarke 1787

Guide book, A Survey of the Lakes of Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire, by James Clarke, Penrith, Cumberland, and in London etc, 1787 and 1789; and Plans of the Lakes ... 1793.
Page 50:-
...
... on the banks of which [River Petteril], five miles below Penrith, is the Ala Petriana of the Romans, by Nicholson called Bremeternacum, by some called Old Penrith.
From this place, the remains of a Roman road may easily at this day be traced ...

placename:- Ala Petriana
other name:- Bremeternacum
other name:- Old Penrith
date:- 1787
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old map:- Stukeley 1723 -- perhaps relevant

The roman name belongs elsewhere.
Map of roman roads through Britain, scale about 55 miles to 1 inch, derived from the Antonine Itineraries, plotted by William Stukeley, 1723, published London, 1724.
thumbnail Stu1Cm, button to large image
Glanoventa / Castlesteds

placename:- Castlesteds
other name:- Glanoventa
date:- 1723
period:- 18th century, early; 1720s

text:- Rivet and Smith 1979

The roman fort at Old Penrith, Plumpton Wall, Cumberland, by the River Petteril.

placename:- Voreda
other name:- Bereda

photographs
tiny photograph, 
button to large Voreda -- Old Penrith -- Plumpton Wall -- Hesket -- Cumbria / -- Roman altar, perhaps from Voreda, in the porch of St Cuthbert, Great Salkeld. -- 26.8.2005

photographs
tiny photograph, 
button to large Voreda -- Old Penrith -- Plumpton Wall -- Hesket -- Cumbria / -- From Hutchinson 1794 map 2. -- 'BREMETENRACUM now Old Penrith'

Old Cumbria Gazetteer - JandMN: 2013

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